Monday, January 8, 2018

ASE conference 2018

Delegates enjoying CIEC's assessment session delivered by Nicky Waller.

It's that time of year again when everyone in science education who can possibly make it dust themselves down from the excesses of Christmas and make their way to the Association of Science Education annual conference.  There can be little doubt that many of us find ourselves regretting our decision to book a place as we get up on a dark morning to make a wintery trek accross the country to that year's venue.  However, there can be no doubt at all that by the end of the conference everyone is very glad indeed that they made the effort.  

Jane Turner and Shaun Reason making density column 'martinis' on the CLEAPS stand at the 'Primary Pop-up'.
The ASE conference is a chance to experience some brilliant CPD delivered by a wide variety of professionals from a number of different perspectives.  It is a place to learn about new approaches and innovative ideas backed up by first hand experiences and cutting edge research.  It is also an opportunity to share our own latest initiatives, activities and research. 

Dr Maria Turkenburg shared some of the latest researh about CIEC's 'Children Challenging Industry' at her session 'Attitudes up: CCI sucess'

Just as important as being introduced to new ideas is being reminded about tried and tested lessons and approaches which we had forgotten about.  In the same way, the conference is a place where we make new friends and contacts as well as reconnecting with old ones and seeing familiar faces.  Most importantly, the ASE conference is a place where everyone believes in the importance of high quality science education for all children and where we are reinvogorated by each other's enthusiasm and excitement.

CIEC's Practical idea's for teaching materials session led by Joy Parvin.
When I was working in the classroom, especially in the early years of my career, the ASE, largely through the conference, played an important role in shaping my attitudes and understanding.  The influence was not only on science teaching in particular but on education in general.  I still have to pinch myself as I realise that now, as well as continuing to learn from other teachers at the conference, I am able to contribute  by running my own session!

Teachers extracting starch from a potato during CIEC's 'Potatoes to plastic' session led by Jane Winter.
Another important part of the conference is the exhibition where (as well as picking up several 'freebies') we find out what is available to support science education.  This includes products and  books but also ideas for activities to support the curriculum.  When I was teaching I found lots of ideas for things things to do in my school including visits from Sphere Science and activities from Practical Action.  Of course no trip to the conference would be complete without a visit to the ASE book stand.

The ladies from Sphere science, the newly released ASE guide to primary science from the ASE book stall, a bug from Zoolife and the Practical Action stand; a tiny sample of the exhibition.
If you haven't been before make sure that you make a note now of next year's conference which will be on the 9th to the 12th January in Birmingham.  If you were at Liverpool no doubt you will already have resolved to go and we look forward to seeing you there.

Nicola Beverley listening to Nicky Waller telling everyone about her book at the Primary Teachmeet on Saturday.

by Jane Winter     

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